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Celebrate Jane Jacobs 100th


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Celebrate Jane Jacobs 100th


The Center's purpose is to enhance the understanding of the complexity of contemporary urban life and through it, promote increased civic engagement among people who care deeply for their communities.

The Center’s programming includes publishing What We See: Advancing the Observations of Jane Jacobs and Urban Acupuncture and sponsoring Jane Jacobs Walk, self-organized walking tours throughout the world. The Center for the Living City also sponsors symposia, exhibitions, fellowships, workshops and other community events.

 

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Citizen Jane: Battle For The City


Coming soon to a community near you | 2017

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Citizen Jane: Battle For The City


Coming soon to a community near you | 2017

 

A Film By Matt Tyrnauer, A Robert Hammond and Matt Tyrnauer Production

This is a story about our global urban future, in which nearly three-fourths of the world’s population will live in cities by the end of this century. It’s also a story about America’s recent urban past, in which bureaucratic, “top down” approaches to building cities have dramatically clashed with grassroots, “bottom up” approaches. Around the world today, among rising powers such as China and India, new mega-cities are being built “top down,” with little or no input from those who inhabit them, or from the communities who have been displaced to make way for their construction. By bringing back to life the struggles and battles over urban planning in the 20th century United States, Citizen Jane: Battle for the City shows that anti-democratic approaches to city planning and building are fundamentally unsustainable; a grassroots, “bottom up” approach is imperative to the social, economic, and ecological success of tomorrow’s global cities. 

In the words of American urbanist Jane Jacobs:

“Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.” – Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities

The film highlights Jane Jacobs’ magisterial 1961 treatise The Death and Life of Great American Cities, in which she single-handedly undercuts her era’s orthodox model of city planning, exemplified by the massive Urban Renewal projects of New York’s “Master Builder,” Robert Moses. Jacobs and Moses figure centrally in our story as archetypes of the “bottom up” and the “top down,” respectively. They also figure as two larger-than-life personalities: Jacobs—a journalist with provincial origins, no formal training in city planning, and scarce institutional authority seems at first glance to share little in common with Robert Moses, a high prince of government and urban theory fully ensconced in New York’s halls of power and privilege. Yet both reveal themselves to be master tacticians who, in the middle of the 20th century, became locked in an epic struggle over the fate of the city. In three suspenseful acts, Citizen Jane: Battle for the City gives audiences a front row seat to this battle, and shows how two opposing visions of urban greatness continue to ripple across the world stage, with unexpectedly high stakes.

 

ADDITIONAL CREDITS

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER

Juliet Page, Pierre Lagrange, Bernard Lagrange

CINEMATOGRAPHER

Chris Dapkins

DIRECTOR

Matt Tyrnauer

PRODUCER

Robert Hammond, Matt Tyrnauer, Corey Reeser, Jessica Van Garsse

CONNECT

Website | @janejacobsdoc | Facebook

 
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Jane Jacobs Fellowship 2017


Call for Applicants

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Jane Jacobs Fellowship 2017


Call for Applicants

 

2017 FELLOWSHIP Announcement

 

We are seeking an individual who is passionate about helping to empower girls and young women to be leaders and advocates for their communities. This one-year fellowship will expand and initiate a program that helps develop their voices and skills through the power of observation, communication, and action.

 

 
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Jane Jacobs Walk


Walk | Observe | Connect

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Jane Jacobs Walk


Walk | Observe | Connect

 
 

Jane Jacobs Walk is a program of the Center for the Living City. We celebrate her life and legacy by inviting people to organize walks in their communities throughout the year.

Jane Jacobs Walk in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Photo Credit: Camila Selva Cabral

Jane Jacobs was a community organizer who helped save her neighborhoods from destruction by the hands outside interests.  She invited everyone to see how cities actually work through experience, to go out and see what makes a neighborhood thrive, or to see what makes a neighborhood struggle.  And she opposed those who insisted on the same solutions to fix the unique challenges in cities.

We honor Jane Jacobs by helping people leave the isolation of their homes to come together to experience areas of their city outside of the automobile. The purpose of Jane Jacobs Walk is to engage people in walking, observing, and connecting with their communities. We invite people to make a difference because a Jane Jacobs Walk enables members of a community to discover and respond to the complexities of their city  and environment through personal and shared observation.

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Center Exhibitions


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Center Exhibitions


Learning from Disaster: New Orleans After Katrina

Three months after Hurricane Katrina undermined the lives and places of people in New Orleans, the Center for the Living City organized a team of students from Purchase College to go to New Orleans and learn from the disaster.  While in New Orleans, students participated in stripping homes and preparing them for reconstruction. Using the power of observation informed through the work of Jane Jacobs, volunteers from the Center led students in a process where exploration, information and knowledge gained led to an exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York titled, Learning from Disaster: New Orleans After Katrina. An important component of this exhibition was comparing and contrasting the experience of students whose lives were changed by the World Trade Center disaster.

About Learning From Disaster